This is why I do what I do

Posted by | November 23, 2017 | Blog, News, Projects, Uncategorized | No Comments

Image above: Little Bang from northern Vietnam – whose journey with eye cancer I follow in my short documentary “Little Bang’s New Eye”.

I realised a few years ago I’m lucky I discovered I have a passion. It may have been realised a little later in life but when it happened, it happened with a bang! (no pun intended in relation to the title of my film:)

I remember the day I decided I would give up my corporate career to become a documentary filmmaker. It was the end of 2006 and I wanted to make a documentary about Tibet for release just before the upcoming Beijing Olympics. I wanted to (and I did) use that documentary to help shed light on the Tibetan struggle since Chinese occupation in 1949.

That passion has continued and has been a solid part of my filmmaking work since.

Last week, I had the first public screening of my short documentary “Little Bang’s New Eye” to a packed theatre as part of a film fundraiser to help raise funds for essential equipment for Sight For All who work in developing countries delivering eye health care. My short film follows the story of a little Hmong girl from Northern Vietnam and her journey with retinoblastoma – a deadly form of eye cancer. Within that story, is another story of how the life of Bang and her older sister Vang, were likely saved because of the work of Sight For All.

This film was a labour of love. I offered my time and resources over two filming trips in 2016 and 2017. Those trips were made possible with the support of Sight For All. A week after returning home having completed the first filming trip in 2016, I was diagnosed with a back injury and was unable to work for a couple of months. Fortunately, this improved and in 2017 I was able to return for a second filming trip.

After a screening last Sunday to a packed theatre as part of a film fundraiser, “Little Bang’s New Eye” is now being entered into a number of international film festivals. The hope is that audiences around the world will have a chance to learn about life for some children (and their families) in developing countries, the work of organisations like Sight For All and the chance to be grateful for the health care we have.

This is why I love documentary films. They can educate and inspire and motivate. They give us the opportunity to learn and discover and sometimes just to appreciate what we have.

This is why I do what I do.

If you’d like to support the work of Sight For all, you can donate to their 2017 Christmas Appeal here https://sightforall.org/donate